Ex-head of Birmingham BBC documentary school banned

Thomas MarshallImage copyright
Wild Pictures Ltd

Image caption

Thomas Marshall and Baverstock Academy featured on Panorama in 2014

The former head of a school who starred in a BBC documentary has been banned from teaching by a disciplinary panel.

Thomas Marshall, 50, ran Baverstock Academy in Birmingham when Panorama covered its work in keeping disruptive children in mainstream education.

The panel found he hired his mother’s consultancy firm without declaring it and also did not follow proper recruitment procedures.

Mr Marshall did not wish to make any comment on the ruling.

It is not known whether he had been teaching elsewhere up until the ruling was made.

The school closed in 2017 and was placed in special measures in November 2014. The allegations against Mr Marshall dated from between 2012 and 2015.

West Midlands Police launched a fraud investigation into the school in 2017, but said three people interviewed would face no further action.

In his appearance on Panorama in 2014, Mr Marshall said the school had “one chance” to help its pupils.

“I’m not saying at all we get it right with everyone. But we’re going to try,” he added.

Image copyright
Google

Image caption

Thomas Marshall was head teacher at the now closed Baverstock Academy

The hearing was told Mr Marshall had hired his mother’s company, Stone Educational Consultants, without following the proper tendering process, without declaring its connection to school governors and without ensuring there was proper contract or a service level agreement in place.

A report of the hearing also said he had authorised payments to the company which included VAT charges, despite the company not being VAT registered at the time.

It also found he hired three employees without following proper recruitment procedures and was involved in the recruitment of one person despite having a family connection, which he had failed to declare.

Other allegations against Mr Marshall were found not proven, but, imposing a prohibition order, the panel said “the repeated failure” by Mr Marshall “and his overall lack of insight and remorse” was a significant factor in its decision.

He has 28 days to appeal the order, and can apply to have the teaching ban reviewed after two years.

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